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1 week, 4805 ‘likes’, 971 ‘comments’ July 7, 2010

Posted by bernardrosauer in Uncategorized.
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One week ago I posted a simple request on my LinkedIn update. Specifically, I asked: “I am checking to see how many people actually read LinkedIn updates. If you read this please “like” or “comment” it.”

First, it will help to know that I have 462 direct connections in my network, 95% of whom are located in the US. Average views of my profile prior to this survey was approximately 1 view per day and my profile turns up in search results about as often, 1x per day.

I’m a customer experience consultant and my target market to network in is the insurance market – anything having to do with insurance: brokers, carrier employees, solution providers, recruiters, etc. As a purposely small consulting outfit, my greatest challenge is getting my name, white papers, other information out there – hence my efforts on communicating information via LinkedIn.

Surprising Results

It is incredible to me that so many people took part in this survey with no, zero, nada, nothing promised in return. It is a testament, I believe, to the existence of a general willingness of people to want to help each other when there’s no appearance of a ‘trick’, ‘sale’ and/or ‘return’. Pretty neat.

Less than 1% of the respondents were direct contacts of mine.

Less than 1% of the respondents are in my target market.

Approximately 60% of the respondents were from overseas. Great feedback from all over the world, most notably India.

My profile was reviewed, on average 70 times a day.

Numerous people commented that they received my message but had no 1, 2 or 3 level connections to me. I checked and they were right. Numerous times, when I went to check on respondents, I received a message from LinkedIn that we had no common contacts.

A grand total of 1 person that I counted accused me of using the survey as an attempt to market my wares.
Many others indicated that they had wondered about penetration through LinkedIn and wondered the same thing.

My takeaways are:

1. The benefits of my efforts on LinkedIn aren’t what I thought they were and there’s no business ROE (return on energy) in site.
2. My direct contacts may have chosen to ‘hide’ me and so the content I supply articles, research info., etc., isn’t viewed as useful by the market I wish to penetrate.
3. I should think about redirecting my professional efforts at industry beyond insurance.
4. Lots and lots of people read my updates and I may be wasting their time because the information often does not pertain to them : ) sorry!
5. Continue to look to LinkedIn for people to connect with but connect personally instead of with a broad brush. As a small player, I can’t compete on brand anyway. Need to continue to pound the pavement, phones and write personal letters to tap targets more deeply.
6. Drop the LinkedIn updates to do more of 5.

Hoping you found this information useful,

Bernard Rosauer
brosauer@gmail.com
920.716.1284

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Comments»

1. scott varga - July 8, 2010

I LOVED this experiment! I just commented on it on Linkedin. If you dont mind, I myself would like to do this to my network on Linkedin. Thanks!

bernardrosauer - July 8, 2010

Glad you liked it. By all means, go ahead. I hope that your findings are as useful as mine were.


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